TNNS is a wonderful Pong/Breakout/pinball-inspired action game. Its visual style is bright and bold, its gameplay is genuinely fun, and it’s highly polished all over. It’s almost perfect at everything it does, but there are a couple of aspects that miss the mark…

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It’s hard to believe that GTA: Vice City first came out over a decade ago. I have great memories of the console and desktop versions, so I was keen to get a copy to carry with me to complement the excellent soundtrack box set.

I already knew the game was excellent, with its massive city, deep atmosphere, and free roaming gameplay, so my main concern was whether such a complex game would actually be playable on a handheld device. It’s definitely worth the purchase, but I do have some reservations…

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A year ago, when someone asked me why I used an Android phone, I felt I had to go on the defensive. Tasker! Open source! Customization! Swype!

Today, people don’t ask why I use Android; they ask whether they can try mine. Android has become a legitimate mobile platform, and in this look back over the past year we’ll see how it got there.

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There’s certainly no shortage of free Android apps, but a lot of these are really more like free demos: they’re ad-supported “lite” versions with accompanying paid apps, or they’re 30 day trials, or they require you to unlock extra features via in-app purchases or by paying for a monthly account.

That’s not a bad thing, of course; we shouldn’t expect all developers to give away the products of their hard work for free! But in this roundup, we’ll look exclusively at apps that don’t ask for a penny.

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Google I/O 2012, Google’s annual developer conference is this week, and yesterday’s keynote speech saw the company unveil Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean), the Nexus 7 (an official Android tablet), new apps for Maps, Currents, and Google+, Android’s own search assistant, and more.

In case you missed the presentation, here’s a quick overview.

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When I think of Android devices, I typically think of tablets and slate phones, with the occasional sliding or fold-out keyboard. But because of Android’s flexible, open-source nature, it’s not been restricted to rectangles with big screens; the OS has been crammed on to all sorts of hardware.

Sometimes this can be a bad thing, as when hasty manufacturers stuck a phone version of Android onto cheap tablets without polishing it up. But other times, this can be really cool, and genuinely innovative.

In this article, I’d like to celebrate the range of hardware features that Android has let manufacturers experiment with – even if they weren’t all successful!

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The talented hackers at XDA have done it again. iROM is a port of iOS that can run on Android firmware, using an “iOS virtual machine emulator”.

It’s missing a few features, but this is still great news. At last, we can have what we’ve wanted all along: an iPhone that’s not made by Apple.

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In February, we here at Android.AppStorm put together our best tips, tricks, features, and shortcuts. This month, we’ve gathered our favorite apps – the ones we use all the time, and that we’d recommend to our friends.

There’s a bit of overlap, naturally – between us, we use four or five different Twitter apps! We’ve skipped all the stock apps, however; we’re not giving out awards for great design, we’re trying to recommend apps that you might not already be aware of. By the same token, I doubt we need to tell you about the official apps for Facebook or Twitter; if you’re already a user, you know about the app, and if you’re not a user, the apps are unlikely to convince you to become one.

So here are 100 apps that, between us, we recommend trying out. Enjoy!

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For the past few months, we here at Android.AppStorm have been collating our best tips, tricks, features, and shortcuts. Some are useful, some are geeky, some are just for fun.

As with all such lists, you’re probably aware of some of these tips already – but I bet you don’t know all of them! Did you know that you can search your text messages, Kindle books, and tweets all at once? Or that CyanogenMod 7 lets you disable two-thirds of the LEDs in your display, to save battery? Or that you can force websites to show you the full version of their site, even though you’re on a mobile browser? Read on to find out more…

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A lot has happened with Android this year: we’ve gone from Gingerbread to Ice Cream Sandwich (via Honeycomb); the Market’s had two big upgrades; Flash Player has been dropped; mobile games have really taken off; and more. On the other hand, Siri put Android Voice Actions to shame; Google withheld Android’s source; and lawsuits have been flung back and forth.

Read on for our overview of everything that happened in 2011!
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