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Rita El Khoury

Rita El Khoury is the Editor of Android.Appstorm and enjoys everything about the ecosystem. From customizing her LG G2 and Galaxy S3, to installing new ROMs, trying new apps, obsessively checking news and releases, she's a self-identified geek with a knack for living on the bleeding edge of technology. Her mobile and app addiction started in 2006, when she launched her Dotsisx blog to focus on the Symbian ecosystem. She has since enjoyed Symbian, iOS, Windows Phone and Android. When she's not keeping Android.Appstorm rolling, she's found behind a counter at Panacea Pharmacy which she owns and manages full-time. You can check her professional LinkedIn profile as well as follow her on Twitter @khouryrt.

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Earlier this week, we published a recap of our favorite Android Twitter clients. Some of our team members love the unique look of Falcon Pro, others the versatility of Plume, and others the simplicity of the official Twitter client.

These were the most popular choices, but there were a lot of other less obvious picks as well, ranging from the old and still excellent Twicca to the new and promising Robird. We realize the choice of a favorite Twitter app is unique for each of us, depending on our uses and needs, so that’s why we ask you: what Twitter client do you use?

Since the timid beginnings of the Android platform, we have seen several Twitter clients rise and soar, some falling quickly, others garnering a loyal fanbase and developing further. From the good ol’ Tweetdeck and Seesmic to the shiny new Falcon Pro and Tweetings, passing by the ever-present and ever-loved Plume, there’s no shortage of Twitter client choice and you’d be hard-pressed to find a topic that ignites passionate debates as much as the “best Twitter client” conversation. Mention that once, and you’ll have a slew of replies from people naming one of dozens of different apps and discussing how excellent their choice is.

On Android.Appstorm, we’ve long ago recognized that there’s really no definite answer to the question. As long as there are developers out there coding new clients, we will try them and we will review them for you. We also reckon that every client is flawed and perfect at the same time. Because there are as many different Twitter usages as there are Twitter users, any app can be excellent for a particular person but simply dreadful for another. That’s why, over the past couple of months, we have shared with you our favorite clients in our “My Twitter Client” series.

Below, you will find quick links to some of our writer’s picks, where they explain what they need in a Twitter app, the reasons for their choice and what they love about it. I’ve also added links to some of our most recent reviews, for a more complete overview of the Twitter options landscape. Check them out, and let us know in the comments which app you use and why.

Team’s Favorite Twitter Clients

Other Twitter Client Reviews

I still remember having a few heated debates back in 2008 with social media advocates about the future of Twitter. At the time, although I had an account on the service, I had never used it. Instead, I was a firm believer that Jaiku — which Google later bought and used as a stepping stone for Buzz and Google+ — would prevail because of its native support for conversations. Twitter was a chaotic mess, with no way to follow a conversation back. But oh how things change!

In 2009, I had abandoned Jaiku and moved to Twitter. But when I switched to Android 2 years ago, the sheer amount of Twitter clients had me befuddled for months until I settled on the official app. Then I got bored, tried several alternatives again, used some for a while, dismissed others quickly… And up to this day, I don’t think there is one Twitter Android client to rule them all, so I use the official Twitter app on my phone, Falcon Pro on my tablet, and Plume on my Android TV stick. Read on to find out why.

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Earlier this week, Amazon announced that they were expanding the availability of their Appstore to 200 more countries, which brings them to an almost worldwide audience. Earlier, if you lived in an unsupported country, you had to resort to a few tricks to install the Appstore on your device, so thankfully, this will no longer be the case.

However, having used the Appstore for a while when it was first launched — especially because of the daily free app offer — I admit that it has lost its appeal and it’s been ages since I’ve even bothered to install it on any of my devices. The main reason is that any app purchased through it requires the Appstore to be installed on your device to even work. That verification process annoyed me enough that I simply let go of Amazon’s Appstore, purchased the free apps that I had gotten through it and that I needed from Google’s Play Store, and never looked back.

Apart from owning a Kindle device, I see very few reasons one would use the Appstore, but I might be wrong. What about you? Do you use the Appstore on your non-Kindle devices?

All throughout March, our team focused on bringing you the best tutorials for personalizing your Android phone or tablet in our Customization Month. From custom ROMs to wallpapers, we took you through a ride of the best ways to personalize everything about your Android experience, gave you examples for inspiration, and showed you where to look for more sources and content.

However, since those articles are scattered across our repository of posts, and since we had published a lot of customization tutorials and round-ups before March, we decided to put them all together for you in one easy-to-navigate list. This makes it easier to bookmark, share with friends, and come back to when you want a full customization resource.

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Over the past couple of weeks, there has been a lot of chatter about Google taking a step to unify their different messaging platforms into one. The rumors started solidifying last week, with screenshots and what seems to be a codename / final name: Babel. At the same time, we’ve also heard news that Google might be lining up to buy the popular messaging client Whatsapp, which was later denied by a spokesperson for the company. Then of course we saw the launch of Facebook Home along with its Messenger Chat Heads.

This whole “rush” towards messaging has us wondering about the platforms that you use to communicate with your friends and family. Are you still reliant on SMS? Have you moved towards traditional IM solutions like Google Talk or Facebook Messenger, or are you using the new solutions like Whatsapp, LiveProfile, and others? Or do you rely on a mix of services to connect with different people?

Earlier today, Connor shared with you the Facebook Home launch news in This Week in Android’s recap. The new launcher should be available to some Android devices on April 12th, and its still unclear whether it will include all functionality — like chat heads and the notification tweaks — or just the launcher and app drawer.

This leaves me rather perplex. On the one hand, it’s interesting to see someone taking a different approach to the Android home beyond widgets and launching apps. On the other, you might not benefit from the full experience unless you have dedicated hardware like on the HTC First.

Besides, it’s still Facebook, which means that the experience will be reliant on your friends. If you have awesome friends who travel, throw parties and are always doing something interesting, then you’ll probably love Facebook Home. But if your “friends” are just high-school acquaintances who post duckfaces, flood you with not-so-adorable kid photos, and chronicle every meal they eat, then you probably won’t enjoy Facebook Home as much as Zuckerberg wants you to.

Will you give this new launcher a try? Or are you not the least bit interested in having Facebook as your home?

March was Customization Month on Android.Appstorm. Throughout the whole month, we shared with you all of our knowledge when it comes to personalizing your Android device. We wanted you to be able to design a homescreen like these with little effort.

There were tutorials about custom ROMs, themes, launchers, fonts; example usages for MultiPicture Live Wallpaper, UCCW and DashClock; awesome HD wallpapers, beautiful icons, and more — much, much more.

When we set out to plan this Customization Month, we wanted to bring you the best tutorials and roundups, without repeating our previous posts, or interrupting our regular coverage of Android apps and reviews. Did we succeed? Did you find this series helpful?

It’s Customization Month on Android.Appstorm! Throughout March, we plan to share with you all our tips, tricks, apps and resources to help you improve your phone or tablet experience and make them suit your style.

One of the new features introduced in Android 4.2 was the ability to add widgets to the lockscreen. For a long time, this feature remained underutilized, with a few apps adding support for it but not many really harnessing its power.

Enter DashClock, a widget that can be added to the lockscreen and offered an open API to allow third-party apps to build extensions for it. DashClock opened a whole world of customization to Android users, as we finally had a customizable widget that didn’t limit us to one app or one notification.

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It’s Customization Month on Android.Appstorm! Throughout March, we plan to share with you all our tips, tricks, apps and resources to help you improve your phone or tablet experience and make them suit your style.

No matter how much you try to customize your Android device with wallpapers, themes, widgets, fonts, and more, there always remains one element very few people change but that can make or break your whole design: icons.

We covered beautiful icons previously on Android.Appstorm, but that was 18 months ago. Nowadays, new designers have come into the picture, new techniques are being used, and design language has morphed tremendously. In this roundup, I will take you through a list of my favorite icon designers and their beautiful creations.

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