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There’s many a reason for you to want to take a screen capture on Android. Maybe you’re a developer wanting to take publicity screenshots of your app? Or maybe you’re wanting to become a writer for a site like this but have no idea how to source images for your post? Well, let me explain.

Unfortunately, screenshot taking is not as easy as on alternative platforms. It involves the Android SDK and USB debugging. So find that cable and get started! (more…)

Ever been reading an article (preferably one of ours) on your desktop but found you need to go catch the bus? Or been reading a story on the way home and want to finish it off on your laptop? With Android 2.2, Froyo, you can do such a thing.

In today’s How To, we’ll be looking at how you can send webpages from Google’s Chrome web browser directly to your phone’s browser, and vice versa. (more…)

Todo.txt Touch is a native Android app for Gina Trapani’s open source command line interface, Todo.txt — a simple tool that lets you manage a todo list based around a single plaintext file. From the website:

Typing commands on your mobile phone isn’t easy or fun, and neither is syncing files from your phone back to your computer. Currently coupled with Dropbox, Todo.txt Touch helps you manage your todo.txt on the go and automatically syncs the file to all your devices.

In this review, we’ll take a look at Todo.txt Touch and what it has to offer.
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Have you ever been in a bar, coffee shop, lift, supermarket or anywhere else that plays music and been bewildered at the currently playing track? Well, no longer. Two apps are available on the Android marketplace, with both free and paid versions, that aim to abolish that irritating moment forever.

Shazam is the popular iPhone and iPad app, which made its way onto Android, that listens to a short clip of a song and “tags” it. The tag reveals the song name, artist, album and several options such as purchasing it (from iTunes on iOS or AmazonMP3 on Android). It comes free on Android with a five song limit per month, while a paid “Encore” version is also available with extra features, including unlimited tagging.

SoundHound is a rival app which is also available on both iOS and Android. It too matches your recorded music clip from its database whether it’s a real song playing or something you’re singing yourself! They claim to be the first app in the world to recognize human-generated humming or singing for tagging purposes. (more…)

More than half of us claim to have had trouble sleeping a few nights each week, and an awful lot more wake up some mornings feeling rotten, exhausted and wanting to go back to bed. Science has pinned down how and why this happens and lifestyle magazines and blogs are littered with simple ways you can make yourself sleep better and feel better the next morning.

Using your phone to track your sleep probably isn’t going to be the first thing that pops into your head, but here are three quick and simple things you can do to help yourself, and three apps you can try to help you beat insomnia, analyze your personal sleep cycle, and wake up peacefully and comfortably the next morning.

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Google announced their new web-based Android Market during yesterday’s event. It allows you to browse, buy and download apps for your Android device entirely through a website, available both on your phone and on your computer. After some technical difficulties preventing me, and a selection of other users, from logging in, I was able to bring my whole Android Market experience to the web.

The release of a desktop-based Android Market is something users have wanted for a long time and is part of a package of updates coming to the store. Google will also be rolling out currency-specific pricing so developers can set specific prices for certain territories to keep them in line with their overall strategy.

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Android is rapidly increasing in market share and this certainly isn’t a consequence of the same people constantly upgrading their phones. In addition to the market’s growth, some users are switching (or upgrading) from other platforms for different reasons: Android is open, cheaper, more customizable; it’s on your preferred network; there’s more choice in terms of hardware… whatever your reason for choosing Android, there’s a big chance you’re a new user.

While Android ships with a number of pre-installed apps (in addition to some custom apps and widgets from the phone maker), the Market also houses a number of fundamental apps that every new user should have. If you’re experienced with Android, be sure to check out our absolutely essential app roundup. If you’re not, then check out this newbies’ list to get you started, instead of jumping in at the deep end.

In this special, extended article, we’re going to take a look at the first steps you should take as a new Android user including a tour of some “hidden” UI elements, must-have apps and widgets and to finish off, some tips. It’s a “Beginner’s Guide” in both senses: it’s designed for new Android users, and written by a relatively new Android user :)

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Depending on whom you ask, the lack of an iTunes-like app for transferring music, apps, videos etc. is either a mark of freedom or a lack of effort from the part of Google. While it is nice not to be confined to one particular desktop app to get content into your mobile, such an app can have some perks: a bigger screen, using existing playlists and libraries, data backup are some among them.

The doubleTwist application makes it possible for us to have syncing facility with a desktop app without the need for any wires. Read on to find out how to set up doubleTwist on your desktop and Android mobile.

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Update (27 May 2015): Since this article was originally written, it’s become much easier to free up space on your Android device. These days it’s possible to take advantage of services such as Google Drive or Dropbox to relieve the strain on your SD card. If you want a more advanced cloud storage solution, check out Hightail, which allows you to access and share important files on your Android devices or anywhere else.

“Low on space: Phone storage space is getting low.” Uh-oh. This issue is easy to fix if you’ve rooted your phone, but what if you haven’t? Let’s take a look at the possibilities…

What’s the Big Deal?

Does it really matter if you run out of internal phone storage? After all, you’ve got an SD card that can fit gigabytes of data and applications.

Actually, yes; being low on internal storage causes problems. If you’ve got less than 25MB free, you won’t be able to install over-the-air updates to your system (including new versions of Android). Less than about 15MB, and you can’t sync emails, Facebook statuses, calendar appointments, and so on. Also, some applications can only be installed to the internal storage: Flash Player 10.1 and the AIR for Android runtime are two big examples of this, each weighing in at a hefty 10MB.

Rooting your phone allows you to move these applications — as well as various system files — to the SD card, freeing up plenty of space. In this article, we’ll look at what you can do if you don’t want to root it.

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