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Recently, Gmail announced a new way of displaying email that presumably cleans up your inbox and makes you more organized — you can read more about it in Mark Wilson’s review. After using it on both the desktop and my phone, I’ve got to say they’ve done a good job. However, one thing they have not implemented yet is a priority inbox for close family and friends. While the Primary inbox does a nice job of filtering out automatic emails from social networks, shopping sites, and more, there is no way to differentiate work from personal email.

That’s where Dextr comes in. The app bills itself as a new mail experience that brings you closer to the people you love. Dextr’s goal is clear: to make it easier for you to communicate with the people you care about the most.

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Have you noticed that we tend to forget our passwords when we need them the most? For instance, let’s say you need to check your account balance before writing a check, but can’t remember your credentials to do that. Or how about the time when you wanted to book a plane ticket and realized your credit card and passport weren’t at hand?

Thanks to SafeWallet, you can say goodbye to these embarrassing moments, as all your credentials and passwords are saved on your phone and even synchronized across devices and platforms. This way, your sensitive data will always be up to date and handy.

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The Silent Age is shaping up to be one of the best point-and-click adventure games of recent memory. House on Fire’s crowdfunded effort is being teased out in episodes, and if the first one is anything to go by, we’re in for a special treat.

Between a compelling, well-written story, logical puzzle design, a great touch interface, polished graphics and sound, and an interesting protagonist, there’s almost nothing to fault — almost being a key word there, as its two notable shortcomings are difficulty (it’s easy) and length (this first episode lasts a few hours, tops).

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The internet was supposed to be a democratizing platform free from limitations and boundaries. But these days it seems that web users are happy to embrace services that impose certain restrictions. There are countless social networks and blogs out there, but Twitter, with its 140 character limit, is the most popular — just like there are numerous ISPs to choose from, but even those that impose download restrictions remain popular.

Similarly, there are numerous ways you could record video footage, but Vine only allows for the creation of clips up to six seconds long. Despite this, it is proving incredibly popular. I had to take a look to find out what all the fuss is about.

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If there’s one thing I love as much as listening to music, it’s discovering new music — I’m always on the lookout for new scenes, sub-genres, and artists to feed my craving for novel sounds. Unfortunately, that habit isn’t very easy to keep up where I live — Spotify, Pandora, Rdio and Google Play Music aren’t yet available in India, which means that I can’t check out recommendations, playlists and new tracks from popular content providers.

That’s why I was glad to have stumbled upon Earbits Radio, a new internet radio app that brings you tons of indie and mainstream artists no matter where you’re located. The app has scores of channels with something for everyone, and even learns your taste in music from locally stored tracks on your device. But is it enough to help you get your melody fix? Let’s tune in and find out.

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Google’s latest Android version 4.2 Jelly Bean brought a major upgrade to how our devices captured photos. In addition to still photos and panoramas, Google included a new feature called Photo Spheres. The technology allows users to take a 360-degree photo, bringing a whole new look to some familiar sights. The process is similar to panoramas in that the software takes multiple photos and then stitches them together using Google’s powerful recognition software. However, as the name suggests, the technology allows you to take a 360-degree view, something that panoramas don’t handle very nicely.

The major change with Photo Spheres is that they are unfortunately no longer a traditional image stretched out like panoramas are. By default, they are almost a video or an animated gif that rotates your view around the sphere. Because of this aspect, it has become rather difficult to properly share Photo Spheres in the format they are meant to be viewed in. It is important to note that you can get a flat copy of the photo to share through traditional channels, but it won’t provide the 360-degree feeling that they are meant to.

As it stands the most efficient way to share a Photo Sphere and maintain the 360-degree viewing rotation is through Google+. However, that limits you to only sharing with people that are in your circles and only being able to receive Photo Spheres from them as well. SphereShare aims to solve this by offering a service to share Photo Spheres with other users all around the world.

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Today I drove the getaway vehicle in a bank robbery, repaired a remote antenna tower, ran several criminals off the road, rushed a patient to the hospital, and successfully parked a bus. It wasn’t easy, but duty called — and I wasn’t about to be beaten by a bunch of dastardly traffic cones or inconveniently-placed street light poles.

Duty Driver is like a taster for the vehicle simulation genre of games — a packed field on PC that includes such classics as Euro Truck Simulator and Street Cleaning Simulator — okay, maybe that second one isn’t a classic, but I think you get that it’s a broad field. I never understood their appeal, but now I think I’m starting to get it. And my stint in each of Duty Driver’s five roles is what helped me overcome my distant air of curious bemusement.

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As far as I’m concerned, there are too many ways to listen to music these days. Part of the problem is that most of us have way too many devices, and they don’t all cooperate. My Apple devices have iTunes, and I love iTunes, but Android obviously doesn’t. So while my iTunes library sits at about 10,000 songs, I have zero access to it from my Android devices. [Ed note: unless you use iSyncr to sync files between iTunes and Android.]

My $10/month subscription to Rdio helps assuage some of those concerns. After matching my iTunes collection to what’s available on the popular streaming service, it’s easy for me to stream almost all of my music to my Nexus 4 or Nexus 7 whenever I need it. Not only that, but I can check out new music without paying extra fees and I can manage my playlists from my mobile devices with ease. Maybe you don’t already have an Rdio subscription but your Android phone is your main music device. Is the Android Rdio app worth the subscription fee?

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Music is a medium I really love. It provides a great way to relax and makes long revision sessions a bit more exciting. Over the years, I’ve built up quite a big collection of music, however, because of the quantity of files and their size, I’ve never been able to have every song in exactly the same place.

The majority of my music files reside in iTunes — and that should be the same for a lot of people. With well over 10,000 songs in my library, iTunes is obviously an invaluable database, but problems arise when I’m out and about. My library is too big to transfer over to my phone and that creates a limit on what I can listen to when I’m away from my computer — which isn’t ideal, to say the least.

Style Jukebox is an online service, and an Android app, that solves this problem by allowing me to move my music into the cloud. After uploading the files, I can instantly access them wherever I am. Read on to find out more.

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It’s amazing how quickly the variety and quality of games have increased and improved in the Play Store over the past couple of years. There are now tons of titles available for Android devices in every genre, with graphics and gameplay that rival those seen on games for best-selling portable consoles. Don’t believe me? What if I told you the new kid on the block is a 2D side-scrolling pixel art endless running arcade fighter?

Besides being a mouthful, that’s really the best way to describe Punch Quest, the latest release from Noodlecake Studios, publishers of such casual entertainers as Ready Steady Bang, Zombie Road Trip and Huebrix (which we loved to bits and reviewed here). You play a dashing hero clearing his way out of a dungeon filled with ghouls and creepies, and you’re not afraid to let your fists do the talking. Let’s see if all these genres come together to create a knockout title, shall we?

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