Today, Dean Sherwin gave his opinion about HTC’s recent announcement that they would team up with Dr. Dre’s Beats Electronics to add its sound capabilities to their phones.

Brendan has strong opinions on this topic, but I suspect these are not shared by all of our readers. It’s important to clarify the question, though: yes, many people use their smartphone as their only portable MP3 player, so it makes sense to improve the sound capabilities (much like how phone cameras get better and better which each iteration). But is that the only reason for HTC’s new arrangement?

I don’t personally draw an immediate connection between HTC and Dr. Dre; “quietly brilliant” and “**** tha Police” don’t quite gel. This is largely where the calls of “sellout” come from: HTC partnering with someone they wouldn’t usually be associated with, to generate publicity and reach a larger audience. If they had simply announced that they were working on improving their audio technology because they thought that mobile users would appreciate it, they would not have received as much attention.

But perhaps I’m being unfair. Maybe HTC did decide that audio was their next important area to tackle, realised they’d be better off partnering with an existing technology company than trying to develop something from scratch, and found that Beats was both high quality and willing to do business. What do you think? Vote in the poll, and leave your opinions in the comments.

The word ‘sellout’ is thrown around a lot lately. It seems just about every time a writer, YouTuber, blogger or artist tries to make some cash from their creations they’re accused of going corporate, selling their soul to the devil, and becoming too ‘mainstream’ for the hipsters. I hate these labels not because they bear down on the sorry soul who tried to validate their work with currency, but because they’re normally applied by those who’d kill to have skill so they too could ‘sell out’.

You can imagine the Tom & Jerry style fiasco that kicked off inside me when I applied the same label to my favourite phone manufacturer, HTC.


There are many different Android Tablets on the market today, and it may seem hard to decide which one suits your needs the best. Most of these tablets are very expensive, which makes shopping for one slightly difficult. ASUS wants to change all of that, with their new tablet, the Eee Pad Transformer. What’s special about this tablet, aside from the detachable keyboard dock, is the price. The Transformer is available for $399.99 for the 16GB WiFi model, and $499.99 for the 32GB WiFi model.

The detachable keyboard is what truly sets the Transformer apart from the other tablets. The dock will set you back an extra $150, but when you learn all of the features, it’s well worth it. Not only does the keyboard make typing a breeze, but it also houses a second battery, which can essentially double the battery life of the tablet. I picked one up a few weeks ago, read on to see my full review of the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer.


Everyone loves arcade games. They’re addictive, immersive and, of course, fun! The problem is that most of them have been ‘done before’. We all love to play Space Invaders or Pacman, but if we play a clone of it on our phones, it hasn’t really got that ‘classic’ feel. Spirit HD is an original arcade game which is designed for phones, and immensely fun to play!

Elixir 2 is a massively powerful ‘Swiss Army Knife’ of an application that can tell you a great deal about your Android. It gives you quick access to just about every setting, detail and function your device has, in addition to providing you with a set of fully configurable and customisable widgets. If you want to take control of your device like never before, read on for my comprehensive review… (more…)

I am a huge Google fan and a huge fan of Android OS. While I admit that the iPhone changed the smartphone market (how could I not), I still think that iOS leaves a lot to be desired, and that Android is a far superior mobile OS for many reasons.

However, a lot of people have trouble seeing that because of what the tech world now calls fragmentation – the fact that Android is on so many different devices. This has proven to be a challenge for Google because you may get a subpar device running Android, which reflects poorly on the OS. It’s for this reason (mainly) that I’m excited about the recent deal for Google to purchase Motorola’s mobile arm, Motorola Mobility.


Have you ever listened to a song, and found yourself singing words understandable only by you, as if written in some strange dead language? Can you speak Spanish but have immense difficulty hearing the individual words of a Latin song? Do you still think the Beatles sang Chicken to Ride?

It has always been possible to go online and look for the lyrics of a song, but this involves the tedious steps of loading a browser and entering the exact names of the song and artist. With TuneWiki, this problem is solved, because when you are listening to a song on your phone, the app gets the lyrics through the internet and displays them in a fun karaoke mode. Furthermore, if you wish, it can translate them into over 40 languages.

But the app is not only a bridge to a complete database of lyrics and songs; it has a few more features that make it very attractive, besides being a powerful media player. (more…)

With three major social networks out there now (Google+, Facebook, and Twitter), I find myself explaining the difference between Facebook and the others more often than ever. How Twitter is best for real time sharing en masse; how Facebook focuses on personal relationships; and how Google+ allows you to create small communities out of the people you know for “know your audience”-style sharing.

Since Google+ entered the ring, Facebook has been feeling the pressure to step its game up. They launched video chat with Skype from within Facebook, no extras needed. Most recently, they’ve launched Facebook Messenger, an app that makes it easy to communicate with Facebook (and non-Facebook) friends to really build those personal relationships.


We’ve collected the top four reviews, roundups and how-to articles from across the AppStorm network in August. Whether you’re interested in Mac, iPhone, iPad, Web, or Android apps, there’s bound to be something you didn’t spot over the course of the month. Now would be a good time to explore a part of the AppStorm Network you’ve never seen before!

Thanks for reading AppStorm, and I hope you enjoy looking over some of our favourite posts from last month!


Rumors about new tablets from Amazon and Sony have been floating around for a while, but — perhaps due to IFA 2011 kicking off this week — we’ve seen a lot of new information released.

First up are the two new Sony tablets (pictured above; more images here): the wedge-shaped S1 and the hinged S2. According to CNET UK, the S1’s doorstop shape makes it easier to read lying down on a desk, but apart from that it seems par for the course. The S2, on the other hand, has two 5-inch touchscreens in a clamshell design, which makes it quite different from other tablets; for example, the keyboard, when activated, takes up the entire bottom screen. (Sounds like Sony’s been taking tips from the Nintendo DS range.)

Both tablets run Honeycomb, though the S2’s version is obviously modified to cope with its unique design, and are “PlayStation Certified”, like the Xperia Play handset. Neither are really trying to compete on price; the S1 is the same price as the iPad 2, while the S2 is set to cost £100 more in the UK (which usually translates to around $100 more in the USA).

Then there’s Amazon’s new tablet. Okay, this hasn’t been officially announced, but the rumors are so numerous that it’s fair to assume they’re working on something. PC Advisor’s rumor roundup suggests that there’ll be both a 7-inch and a 9- or 10-inch model, with built-in support for Amazon’s Android Appstore and its Cloud Player, and will be priced far cheaper than other comparable tablets on the market. Presumably this, along with the great reputation of the Kindle, will help sell huge numbers of tablets.

Other recently-released tablets may have flown under your radar, like the Eee Pad Transformer with its detachable QWERTY keyboard. Keep an eye on the site for our official review!

All of this is pretty much the same story that we see in the mobile industry: Apple has one current device at any given time — which is incredibly popular — and Android has a wide range of devices with different designs, features, and capabilities. It works well in the mobile industry, but perhaps that’s because everyone wants a handset; can this strategy scale to the luxury market of tablets? Vote in the poll and leave a comment to let us know what you think!

Page 104 of 137« First...102030...102103104105106...110120130...Last »