Games. We’ve already covered and rounded up a lot of them for Android, but today we’re taking a bit of a different look at gaming on our beloved mobile operating system. In this roundup, we’ll take a look at apps for keeping up-to-date with the gaming industry, apps to help you out during gameplay and other apps to stay engaged with your favourite gaming franchises when you’re not actually playing. (more…)

I’ve been trying to use my tablet more often lately, and love trying out new habits with it, such as browsing Reddit (yep, I’m just getting hooked), reading graphic novels and managing my finances more efficiently. As it turns out, tablets are great for keeping tabs on where your money goes — the form factor lends itself to easy perusal of charts and graphs that show your spending habits. Today we’re going to take a look at some of the best apps available for watching over your wealth.

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Another week, another set of Android news. In the run up to Google I/O we’ve had a week fairly bare of news yet full of speculation. There’s been some new apparent developments in Google’s Wallet product, including the departure of Osama Bedier, the company’s Wallet Vice President, in addition to the delay of the retail Ouya, a number of app updates and more. Let’s dive in and take a look at This Week In Android! (more…)

If there’s one rule that I’ve drummed into people over the last decade it’s that digital zoom in smartphone cameras is a no-no. You gain nothing and, if anything, actually degrade the image of what you’re trying to capture. And I bet that you’ve seen some horrendous examples of digital zoom in action in the past, with little more than VGA resolution images blockily upsampled to 5 megapixels because the user ‘wanted to get closer’.

Which is why I find myself, somewhat shockingly, pulling a slight about turn on the subject of digital zoom. Don’t get me wrong, it can still produce ugly results in the worst cases but, used wisely, it can help rather than hinder.

Here then is everything you ever wanted to know about when it’s OK to use the digital zoom built into every smartphone camera.

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Take Your Markdown Documents to Go With Draft

Plain text files are great because they are low on file size, but they are extremely limited when it comes to presentation. To that end, noted blogger John Gruber created a simple markup language called Markdown, which allows for easy formatting for writers and increased readability when displayed. The syntax used in Markdown is simple to learn and use, and can be processed by a number of programs. So what’s all this got to do with your documents?

Most text editors for mobile devices typically allow either plain-text editing or rich document editing, which are both cumbersome to deal with when it comes to posting your content on the web. With Markdown, you can create formatted text documents that are as light as plain text files, read them using any plain text editor and display the content with headings, bold and italic text and active hyperlinked text. And now, you can do this on the go with Draft.

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Relic Rush: A Fun One-Touch Retro Homage to Indiana Jones

Games have been aping Indiana Jones since Raiders of the Lost Ark burst into the cinema in 1981, but few execute on their vision as well as Relic Rush — a retro-styled one-touch game of racing through dungeons and tombs in search of treasure.

It’s pretty light on depth, but it’s so well made and cleverly conceived as to be a glorious distraction worthy of the hour or two time investment.
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Many of us have devices that run on different operating systems, for example a work iPhone and a personal Android device. Looking at my specific case, I use a Samsung Galaxy Note II as my everyday phone and recently bought an iPad mini, which led me to explore ways of keeping the two in perfect sync.

In an always-connected world, it’s relevant for the two devices to communicate with each other and share data. Most importantly, having your emails, contacts and calendars synchronize from one device to the other is essential. This process should be seamless and transparent to you, so that all your content can be updated on both devices with no hassle. That’s what I will explore in the first part of this series.

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When Google launched Keep a couple of months ago, everyone started comparing it with similar apps that have been around much longer. Although Evernote was the most talked about, there is no dearth of note-taking apps on the web or any of the popular mobile platforms. From plain text solutions to feature-packed mammoths, there is a ton of competition out there.

Having tried and endlessly switched between a whole bunch of apps over the years, I decided to give Keep a shot to check how it fared against some of the others that have come close to being a staple on my Galaxy Nexus.

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Recently Google released its new note-taking solution, Google Keep. The competition in this area is pretty stiff with a lot really great apps that already exist — just off the top of my head, there’s Evernote, Simple Notes, Fetch, and OneNote. With these and more already in the note-taking app space, how does Google Keep measure up? After using it for several weeks in real-world scenarios, here’s what I found out.

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Anything “mini” seems to be so popular these days. We have mini cars (think Mini Cooper), mini animal breeds (think toy poodles and Chihuahuas), and even mini candies (think miniature Snickers, etc.) Did you know there is such a thing as mini Android browsers? You may have come across one of them in the Play Store and thought the same thing I did the first time I saw one: “What in the world is a mini browser and what would you use it for?”

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