How can you not love Pixlr? I’m certainly a fan of the series of photo-editing apps. Originally, I was impressed by the desktop version of Pixlr-o-matic, and then by Pixlr’s free online Editor. Nowadays, however, Pixlr has moved with the times, and has added its own app, Pixlr Express, to the massed ranks of mobile editors available for download on both Android and iOS.

Pixlr Express is free in the Play Store, which is surprising, given its apparent wealth of features and editing competence. At the time of writing, well over ten million folks have installed this freebie, so the assumption is that Autodesk, the developer, is doing something right. Does Pixlr Express provide genuine competition to Adobe’s paid-for Photoshop Touch, or is the lack of price-tag attached to Pixlr Express indicative of a lack of quality? Time to find out…

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Blowing up cartoony worms is more fun than it sounds. Team17’s Worms series exploded onto the PC gaming scene in 1995, adding a touch of Lemmings-esque dark humor to the formula of taking turns to shoot projectiles at an opponent across a deformable landscape.

The cute little critters wasted little time after conquering the Amiga, expanding to several other platforms and a franchise with more than a dozen entries. Now they’ve set their sights on Android with the excellent Worms 2: Armageddon. And the good news is that the series is intact and just as compelling on mobile.

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Since the timid beginnings of the Android platform, we have seen several Twitter clients rise and soar, some falling quickly, others garnering a loyal fanbase and developing further. From the good ol’ Tweetdeck and Seesmic to the shiny new Falcon Pro and Tweetings, passing by the ever-present and ever-loved Plume, there’s no shortage of Twitter client choice and you’d be hard-pressed to find a topic that ignites passionate debates as much as the “best Twitter client” conversation. Mention that once, and you’ll have a slew of replies from people naming one of dozens of different apps and discussing how excellent their choice is.

On Android.Appstorm, we’ve long ago recognized that there’s really no definite answer to the question. As long as there are developers out there coding new clients, we will try them and we will review them for you. We also reckon that every client is flawed and perfect at the same time. Because there are as many different Twitter usages as there are Twitter users, any app can be excellent for a particular person but simply dreadful for another. That’s why, over the past couple of months, we have shared with you our favorite clients in our “My Twitter Client” series.

Below, you will find quick links to some of our writer’s picks, where they explain what they need in a Twitter app, the reasons for their choice and what they love about it. I’ve also added links to some of our most recent reviews, for a more complete overview of the Twitter options landscape. Check them out, and let us know in the comments which app you use and why.

Team’s Favorite Twitter Clients

Other Twitter Client Reviews

I still remember having a few heated debates back in 2008 with social media advocates about the future of Twitter. At the time, although I had an account on the service, I had never used it. Instead, I was a firm believer that Jaiku — which Google later bought and used as a stepping stone for Buzz and Google+ — would prevail because of its native support for conversations. Twitter was a chaotic mess, with no way to follow a conversation back. But oh how things change!

In 2009, I had abandoned Jaiku and moved to Twitter. But when I switched to Android 2 years ago, the sheer amount of Twitter clients had me befuddled for months until I settled on the official app. Then I got bored, tried several alternatives again, used some for a while, dismissed others quickly… And up to this day, I don’t think there is one Twitter Android client to rule them all, so I use the official Twitter app on my phone, Falcon Pro on my tablet, and Plume on my Android TV stick. Read on to find out why.

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Mobile gaming, as you probably know, is super popular: people play games on mobile. Because of that, there are tons of games for Android; they even have their own section in the Play Store, completely separate from “Apps.” I have my select crop of games, as I’m sure you do. I prefer 2D side-scrollers — they are simple, somewhat mindless games that help me pass the time. However, when I came across Draw a Stickman I was pretty intrigued. It didn’t seem like your run of the mill adventure game, so I downloaded it and gave it a try. What did I think? Let’s take a look!

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Text messaging – or SMS – is one of the most fundamental functions on any mobile device. Over the last few years, it has arguably taken over voice calling as the single most used feature on a phone. Sure, there have been numerous threats from internet-based multimedia messaging apps like WhatsApp, Viber, Line and more, but the sheer ubiquity of good ol’ SMS text messages has been hard to beat and has kept the technology alive and kicking.

Surprisingly, there aren’t a lot of good dedicated options when it comes to SMS apps on Android. A few stalwarts like Handcent SMS and Go SMS Pro aside, competition has been pretty scarce in this arena. That’s why it’s exciting to see a new contender in Sliding Messaging. I took the app for a spin to check how it fared against Go SMS Pro – which is what I’ve been using for years now. Here’s what I found.

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Social networks are becoming extremely prevalent in our daily lives and people check them from their bed as soon as they wake up. Many need to be constantly connected to their friends and share what’s happening with them. With this need to keep in touch with friends, it only makes sense to access this kind of information more easily.

Facebook Home offers to replace your Android launcher with a new social experience that ensures you’re always aware of your friends’ activities. With this home screen, a quick glance lets you see their photos and posts and your Facebook notifications. It definitely becomes easier to know what your friends are up to and interact with them, but is it worth ditching your current launcher?

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Earlier this week, Amazon announced that they were expanding the availability of their Appstore to 200 more countries, which brings them to an almost worldwide audience. Earlier, if you lived in an unsupported country, you had to resort to a few tricks to install the Appstore on your device, so thankfully, this will no longer be the case.

However, having used the Appstore for a while when it was first launched — especially because of the daily free app offer — I admit that it has lost its appeal and it’s been ages since I’ve even bothered to install it on any of my devices. The main reason is that any app purchased through it requires the Appstore to be installed on your device to even work. That verification process annoyed me enough that I simply let go of Amazon’s Appstore, purchased the free apps that I had gotten through it and that I needed from Google’s Play Store, and never looked back.

Apart from owning a Kindle device, I see very few reasons one would use the Appstore, but I might be wrong. What about you? Do you use the Appstore on your non-Kindle devices?

Historians may remember April 21st as the modern date of the founding of Rome but the 2013 iteration of the day will forever be associated in the Android community as the conclusion of a week which included the international expansion of Amazon’s Appstore and the final release of Google’s Glass Explorer Edition models of Google Glass alongside the details of the device’s specifications.

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It would seem that there’s barely a man, woman, or child alive who doesn’t take and share pictures using their mobile phone. Yet how many of us properly edit images before sharing them online? I don’t mean warping the colours and applying a weird frame – I mean proper editing.

Judging by the deluge of grainy, uninteresting photos which seem to fill my timelines on a daily basis, I would suggest very little editing is going on. In the case of these snaps, though, the lack of editing is understandable. In other situations, however, it’s worth taking a bit more care – one look at the galleries of Kevin Russ or Chris Ozer is enough to illustrate what is possible with a photographically-proficient smartphone, a bit of skill and some mobile editing.

It is with these situations in mind that Adobe has created Photoshop Touch, which joins a very limited selection of heavyweight image editors on Android. The feature set is impressive on paper, but can the editing king of the desktop successfully make the leap to the small screen?

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