In case it’s not already apparent by the fact that I write for an Android site: I love Android! Everything about my little open source assistant, camera, computer, media player and modem keeps me pegged as a loyal user. Unless there’s a dramatic upheaval in the smartphone market I can see myself sticking with the platform for quite some time.

Unfortunately, managing what is effectively a small computer using just my index finger and thumb can be tiresome. Updating contacts, software, music and so on is time consuming. The iPhone has iTunes, and Android has around a million alternatives – the vast majority of which are as useful as an inflatable dartboard.

MoboRobo promises to organise an Android phone in a quick, easy way. Turns out, that’s not all it can do…

(more…)

I’ve been playing Pokémon since I was able to crawl. I love the whole structure of the game: being able to collect pets, train them and fight in duels is a great experience which I still love today. I’ve always followed the notion that a strong game will last forever, whatever age it is. Codemon proves this, while adding a couple of nice twists to the game we all love.

Codemon combines the concepts of Pokémon, Barcode Battler and Pet Collection into a single fun and free game. When I first saw this I was excited – and you should be too!

(more…)

Best of AppStorm in July

We’ve collected the top four reviews, roundups and how-to articles from across the AppStorm network in February. Whether you’re interested in Mac, iPhone, Web, Android, Windows, or iPad apps, there’s bound to be something you didn’t spot over the course of the month. Now would be a good time to explore a part of the AppStorm Network you’ve never seen before!

Thanks for reading AppStorm, and I hope you enjoy looking over some of our favourite posts from last month!

(more…)

There are countless ways in which you can stay in touch with your partner – SMS, email, Facebook and phone calls – but all of these have their limitations. Text messages are limited to text, social networks are too public and phone calls are not always practical.

Avocado provides couples with a means of staying connected, creating what is essentially a private network that can be used to send messages, photos and share lists. This is a simple but surprisingly versatile app and we take a look to put it through its paces.

(more…)

It seems now that everyone and their mother has an e-reader – and why not? E-readers eliminate all of the headaches that come with paperbacks, and replace them with new technological features.

But e-readers like the Nook and the Kindle aren’t the only thing bringing reading into the 21st century: there are many apps that do anything from recommending books to allowing you to save web content for later reading on your mobile device. So read on to find how to make your Android device the ultimate reader’s companion.

(more…)

That widgets are one of Android’s most loved features is no secret. They are clearly one of the platform’s biggest assets and a staple on pretty much every home screen. Although most versions of Android come with a decent set of widgets built in, the real power of the widget comes to the fore with custom widgets available in the thousands on the Play Store.

Unfortunately, I’ve found myself wanting for a decent clock widget that did everything I needed it to do. A search that has seen me experiment with tons of options on the Play Store, including the excellent Minimalistic Text widget that I wrote about a while back and have been using since. As things go in the Android world, the app found its biggest new rival in my books last week with the Ultimate Custom Clock Widget – or UCCW as it is commonly called in the XDA Developer circles.

(more…)

If you’re like me, you spend way too much time customizing your smartphone with launchers, widgets, wallpapers and icons. And why not? With custom interface elements, our phones look cooler than when we took them out of the box. But how about getting them to sound better too?

Enter Ringtonium Pro. It’s a well designed workspace to create ringtones with, whether it’s for calls, messages or Facebook notifications. The app isn’t just all about looks though, and comes with some clever controls for precise editing. But is it worth the money? Let’s find out.

(more…)

Those of you with a Nexus device (or one of the few other phones and tablets with an official Jelly Bean update or unofficial ROM) have surely already tried out Google Now. What do you think of it?

I hate to say it, but I’m a little disappointed — it doesn’t feel ready yet. I was really interested to read Joe’s recent post outlining Google Now, as his experiences don’t match mine.

Part of the issue is that I’m in the UK. I had to fiddle around with the locality settings to switch from the old robot to the new voice in the first place, which was not a good start. And although Google Now understands my asking “When are the Cubs playing?”, showing me a card of the latest scores and giving me updates periodically from then on, it has no idea what I mean by “When is Manchester United playing?”, simply showing me a standard Google search result.

Okay, so it’s not international yet. That’s irritating, but understandable. Unfortunately, other little irritations exist, and they do add up. For instance, setting a reminder is useful, and I find myself doing it a lot: “In 15 minutes, remind me to take the vegetables out of the oven” successfully sets an alarm for fifteen minutes in the future, prompting me to “take the vegetables out of the oven.” Great! But these gradually fill up my stock Alarms list, so that it’s now full of odd times — and there’s no way to select several and delete them all. Plus, a request like “On Tuesday, remind me to do the recycling” brings up an error message, rather than setting an alarm, a calendar appointment, or a Google Task.

There are inconsistencies, too. Most voice actions are given as though talking to a person: “Remind me to X”, “What’s the weather like?”, “Navigate to X”. But “Play music” just loads the Google search results for [play music] (of which the first result is the Play Store listing for, yep, Play Music). To make the phone play music, I have to say, “Listen to music”. And even then it just loads a playlist of songs whose title contains the word “music”!

I could go on, but I won’t. I really like the idea of Google Now; I like the presentation, I like the concept – but it’s not ready yet. In time (and especially when other app developers build on top of it) I think it will be great. But for now, it’s just a novelty that’s more annoying that useful. Do you agree?

Say Hello to the All-New Gamedevtuts+!

We’re excited to let you know about the latest addition to the Tuts+ family — Gamedevtuts+!

Gamedevtuts+ is dedicated to teaching game development, with tutorials, tips, and articles about level layout, game design, coding, and working in the industry. We walk you through how to create games from scratch, go into the theory behind game development, level and character design, discuss working in the industry, and much more…

Read on to find out more about the all-new Gamedevtuts+!

(more…)

When Jelly Bean was officially announced, Android users had a lot to be excited about. The latest version of the OS is super-smooth (like Butter!), there are expandable notifications that actually include functionality, there is a better keyboard, better widgets, and a better camera/gallery.

The biggest announcements, of course, were the addition of a better voice search, and with it, Google Now. So what is Google Now? Let’s find out!

(more…)

Page 60 of 138« First...102030...5859606162...708090...Last »