Posts Tagged

browser

When was the last time you forgot your phone at home and spent the whole day thinking about all the text messages and missed calls you got while you were away? How about that evening when your workout drained your energy away and made you too lazy to stand up, walk all the way to your phone just to reply to that text you just received — Oops, it was just your bank promoting their newest credit card!

We have the right apps for these occurrences: the ones that let you read your text messages straight from your computer, wherever you — and your phone — are. Even better, you’ll be able to reply to messages, send new ones and even check your missed calls from your PC or tablet. Some apps offer even more advanced features, so it’s worth checking them out to find the perfect one for you!
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One of the most obvious advantages that Android holds over its competitors is the ability to have complete control over your files rather than leaving it entirely to the system and individual apps to manage in the background. There’s a lot of choice in how you manage your files though, so we’re here to lend a hand.

In this roundup, we’re going to take a look at eight awesome options for file management on your Android device, all of which fit into Android’s modern look and feel. (more…)

As evidenced by our roundup earlier this year, there are a lot of apps and desktop software out there that allow the pairing of an Android smartphone to a Windows or a Mac computer. Most manufacturers (such as Samsung and HTC) even offer their own software, which ships with many of their devices or is downloadable from their website. But most of these are a bloated attempt at an all-in-one solution to syncing.

Certainly, none offer the finesse and reliability afforded by Chrome 28, Google’s newest version of the browser, along with a neat third-party App. Krome, developed by Damien Piwowarski allows all notifications to appear as a ‘rich notification’ in Chrome. But that’s not all. This beautiful app has a few more tricks up its sleeve.

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Cloud storage has become so ubiquitous that the idea of storing files online is no longer anything out of the ordinary. In fact we are almost spoiled for choice with the number of services competing for our attention and our files – Dropbox, SkyDrive and Google Drive to name but three. And if you’re anything like me, you’ve probably signed up for every gigabit of free cloud storage you can lay your hands on.

All this free space sounds great, but management can become a nightmarish task as every service has its own Android application and you might well find yourself with multiple client apps installed on your device. With CloudCube, this could be a thing of the past as here, in a single app, is a tool that can be used to manage files on no less than eight online repositories. The reliance on dedicated clients had limited me to using just a couple of cloud storage services at a time, so I was keen to see how this free app could help me get past that hurdle.

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Any Android phone or tablet comes supplied with a web browser installed — depending on your carrier or manufacturer you’re likely to find that it is either terrible or just about bearable. But few people stick with the default browser for long and there are now plenty of alternatives to choose from. The likes of Chrome, Firefox and Opera prove about as popular on mobile devices as on desktop computers, but in fact there is even more choice. Next Browser comes from the company best known for producing Go Launcher, and we thought we’d take a look to see how it compared to the competition. (more…)

Anything “mini” seems to be so popular these days. We have mini cars (think Mini Cooper), mini animal breeds (think toy poodles and Chihuahuas), and even mini candies (think miniature Snickers, etc.) Did you know there is such a thing as mini Android browsers? You may have come across one of them in the Play Store and thought the same thing I did the first time I saw one: “What in the world is a mini browser and what would you use it for?”

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Back in its heyday, Xmarks was something of a revelation, providing web users with the incredibly useful ability to synchronize bookmarks between computers. The tool started life as a browser addon called Foxmarks, but soon developed into a utility that encompassed other browsers as well. The later ability to sync passwords was something that was also welcomed all round.

However, it was not long before this form of data synchronization became a standard feature of browsers such as Firefox and Chrome. After being purchased by LastPass, Xmarks lived on as a browser extension as well as a tool for various mobile platforms, including Android. Here, we will take a look at what Xmarks for Premium Customer has to offer.

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Smart phone users usually expect more from their mobile browsers. The way we view websites on desktops is not always the same pleasant experience when we use our phones’ smaller screens. With this demand came a range of browsers for Android, all competing to meet a variety of user expectations.

If you have an Android smart phone, chances are you’ve used (or are still using) Dolphin Browser, Opera, Google Chrome or Firefox Beta. For the longest time, I was pretty happy with having Dolphin as my default browser – until Boat Browser came along. I gravitated towards its simple, clean interface with a resolution slightly larger than Dolphin’s. I was so pleased by its cool original features that I decided to make it my default app for opening websites.

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With the growing concern about privacy on the web today, it makes more sense than ever to keep your identity, information, and traffic secure. In my hunt for secure browsing I discovered the Tor Project: a collection of routed computers which gives you anonymity online. Once I had enjoyed the desktop version I noticed the Android version. I downloaded it, loved it, and would now like to share this application with you.

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When it comes to my mobile browser, I’m but a simple man. I don’t use Opera Mini or Dolphin or Firefox. The stock browser is fine for me because I don’t use gestures and Chrome is my primary desktop browser so I wouldn’t benefit from the syncing capabilities of Firefox. In my experience, the stock browser was always the fastest and least intrusive as far as taking up screen real estate. Then Google released Chrome Beta for Android, and all of that changed. Let’s take a look at what Google’s first crack at a mobile version of Chrome is like.

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