Posts Tagged

dropbox

The management and movement of files is one of the key elements of any digitally-attuned worker’s day. Whether it’s a fundamental image to a website, or a contract-winning Keynote, it is a regular occurrence that we need to make a file accessible to co-workers and to a range of different (usually mobile) devices. This need drives a lucrative industry, which is, unsurprisingly, filled with both giants and smaller, niche services. Box and DropBox fall into the former category, whereas CloudApp, with its strong emphasis on file sharing, clearly falls into the latter, but that doesn’t stop it being a favourite of an impressively large number of users.

It is this popularity that has driven the development of client apps, and one such example on Android is AndroCloud. Blessed with a slick interface and some nifty features it may be, but can AndroCloud, in combination with CloudApp, really provide a better mobile route to file access than Dropbox? Test commencing…

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Good news: it’s time to say goodbye to those sleepless nights wondering whether Apple and Amazon’s clash of the app stores will ever end, although Google Latitude’s going to be on the way out. Let’s take a look at this very software-themed week in the world of Android! (more…)

Cloud storage has become so ubiquitous that the idea of storing files online is no longer anything out of the ordinary. In fact we are almost spoiled for choice with the number of services competing for our attention and our files – Dropbox, SkyDrive and Google Drive to name but three. And if you’re anything like me, you’ve probably signed up for every gigabit of free cloud storage you can lay your hands on.

All this free space sounds great, but management can become a nightmarish task as every service has its own Android application and you might well find yourself with multiple client apps installed on your device. With CloudCube, this could be a thing of the past as here, in a single app, is a tool that can be used to manage files on no less than eight online repositories. The reliance on dedicated clients had limited me to using just a couple of cloud storage services at a time, so I was keen to see how this free app could help me get past that hurdle.

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I remember the time I had a PDA, 11 years ago, and how thrilled I was about editing Word and Excel documents straight from my handheld device. I lost my excitement when I realized the mobile applications didn’t offer the same features as the desktop ones. More than a decade later, our phones and tablets have more processing power than computers did back then. Today, we can surely expect them to offer similar features, no matter the device they’re running on.

Applications such as Google Drive and QuickOffice are useful when it comes to basic text editing and computing, but they don’t provide the same features and experience as the full Office suite. Not only do these often lead to compatibility issues, they also prevent you from accessing advanced features such as Excel macros, custom PowerPoint animations and automated footnotes in Word. CloudOn tries to solve the problem by running Microsoft Office on an actual computer and letting you control it from your phone or tablet. Let’s have a look at what the app has to offer and see if it can really replace a computer to use Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

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Plain text files are great because they are low on file size, but they are extremely limited when it comes to presentation. To that end, noted blogger John Gruber created a simple markup language called Markdown, which allows for easy formatting for writers and increased readability when displayed. The syntax used in Markdown is simple to learn and use, and can be processed by a number of programs. So what’s all this got to do with your documents?

Most text editors for mobile devices typically allow either plain-text editing or rich document editing, which are both cumbersome to deal with when it comes to posting your content on the web. With Markdown, you can create formatted text documents that are as light as plain text files, read them using any plain text editor and display the content with headings, bold and italic text and active hyperlinked text. And now, you can do this on the go with Draft.

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With so many social networks and cloud storage services out there, it can become ridiculously hard to manage them all. Many of us are trying to be everywhere at once, while others just wish everyone else would make up their minds where the best virtual hangout is. Some are torn between their Facebook and Twitter friends, or can’t decide whether to post that photo on Instagram or Photobucket. It can all become overwhelming very fast.

Fortunately, a number of developers have had these same thoughts and aimed to help consolidate your life in the cloud. There are apps that help you post to multiple networks at the same time, apps that let you see all your friends social activity in one place, apps that help you collaborate with colleagues regardless of what tools they choose, and even apps to help you keep your own content in order. This post will highlight a few of these to help you make the most of your life in the cloud.

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Keeping all your devices synchronized with each other has always been a good idea as it lets you juggle phones and tablets, and continue working from the point where you left off without any interruption. There are plenty of apps available to keep videos, music and apps synced across all devices. However, syncing the app’s data is more difficult, especially if you are new to the Android ecosystem. Normally, this entails knowing the correct files that have to be moved between devices and their appropriate location — an easy feat for really knowledgeable users, but a caveat for most others.

To provide a straightforward way to sync app data, there’s a useful utility available only for rooted Android devices, DataSync. In the following tutorial, I will explain how to set up and use DataSync across multiple devices.

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There was a lot of buzz a few weeks ago when Google announced that Docs would become Drive, a general purpose file storage/syncing application with similar functionality to Dropbox. As a matter of fact, I reviewed the web app – the summary being that it’s good, but I will stick with Dropbox. The Android app, on the other hand, offers a completely unique experience that’s worth exploring.

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Dropbox is actually something we’ve covered quite a bit here on AppStorm; most of us use this great service on our computers as well as on our phones. A recent update to Dropbox completely overhauled the app on Android so I thought it was the perfect time to write a review on it: people not already using Dropbox get to hear about it, and current users of Dropbox get to find out what’s new.

If you don’t use Dropbox yet, or have never heard of it please read on – it’s one of the most useful apps I have.

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A few months ago, I wrote a round-up article detailing several utilities to help you make the most out of Dropbox on your Android. At the time the article was written, the only synchronization application I mentioned was Titanium Media Sync, which allowed continuous sync from the device to Dropbox folders, but unfortunately was limited to one-shot sync in the opposite direction. All similar utilities were limited by the same pitfall.

Today, things are different. Enter Dropsync, a client that finally brings a decent solution to this problem. (more…)

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