Posts Tagged

jelly bean

We’ve all been awaiting Key Lime Pie with baited breath, but Google’s once again surprised us with an incremental update to Android. 4.3, which is still called Jelly Bean and largely keeps the same interface we’ve all grown to know and love.

That being said, while 4.3 is an incremental update, it’s also an important one. Google’s bringing some much-needed features to Android that will make life easier for both OEMs like Samsung and HTC as well as average users. Read on to find out about some of the features that most excite us about Android 4.3.

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It’s been a busy week in the world of Android, with Google’s Android and Chrome event hosting a bunch of pretty major announcements, including an update to one of our favourite 7-inch tablets. Let’s dive in and take a look! (more…)

It used to be the case that PC users had the choice of installing Windows or, if they were feeling adventurous, a version of Linux. This is still true, but it is now also possible to install OS X without owning a Mac and virtualization means that you can do all of this alongside your main operating system in a virtual computer.

This being Android.AppStorm, you may well wonder what virtualization has to do with your phone or tablet. Well, how would you feel about the chance of installing and running Android on your PC? Using a free copy of VirtualBox and the information in this guide, you can run a fully functioning – and legal – version of Jelly Bean on your computer.

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Google’s latest Android version 4.2 Jelly Bean brought a major upgrade to how our devices captured photos. In addition to still photos and panoramas, Google included a new feature called Photo Spheres. The technology allows users to take a 360-degree photo, bringing a whole new look to some familiar sights. The process is similar to panoramas in that the software takes multiple photos and then stitches them together using Google’s powerful recognition software. However, as the name suggests, the technology allows you to take a 360-degree view, something that panoramas don’t handle very nicely.

The major change with Photo Spheres is that they are unfortunately no longer a traditional image stretched out like panoramas are. By default, they are almost a video or an animated gif that rotates your view around the sphere. Because of this aspect, it has become rather difficult to properly share Photo Spheres in the format they are meant to be viewed in. It is important to note that you can get a flat copy of the photo to share through traditional channels, but it won’t provide the 360-degree feeling that they are meant to.

As it stands the most efficient way to share a Photo Sphere and maintain the 360-degree viewing rotation is through Google+. However, that limits you to only sharing with people that are in your circles and only being able to receive Photo Spheres from them as well. SphereShare aims to solve this by offering a service to share Photo Spheres with other users all around the world.

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In today’s This Week In Android installment, Connor pointed out that Android 4 — including ICS, Jelly Bean 4.1 and 4.2 — is now installed on more devices than Gingerbread, the previous king of Android versions.

It was bound to happen at one point, as more and more devices get released or updated with the new Android versions, and old devices stop being used. For example, I have 4 Android units, 2 of which are on ICS and 2 on Jelly Bean. There’s no more Gingerbread in my life.

But what about you? Please vote in the poll, and make sure you enter multiple selections if you have several devices.

From the release of the Nexus 7 in the summer to a whole line of Nexus products in the fall, Android has come a long way in the past year. Sadly, hurricane Sandy struck the USA’s East Cost right when Google wanted to proudly unveil their newest line-up, so their announcement was restricted to mass e-mails and an online launch.

Alongside the Nexus 7, Google launched the Nexus 10, a 10-inch NVIDIA Tegra 3 powered tablet, and the Nexus 4, a 4-inch smartphone with a 1.5 GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor. To support these devices, the company “refreshed” Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, giving it a version bump to 4.2, while retaining the Jelly Bean codename. Want to find out the improvements done? Read on.
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One of the most important reasons I decided to buy a Samsung Galaxy S3, instead of waiting for the new Nexus device, was that given the popularity of the Galaxy brand, there were bound to be hundreds of custom ROMs developed for it. See, if there was an AA group for customization addicts, I’d be standing there now and introducing myself, “Hello, my name is Rita and I’m an addict.”

For about 2 months after getting the S3, I gave Samsung the benefit of the doubt, restraining myself to their own ICS flavor. However, the delay in official Jelly Bean’s arrival on my device and the itch to try something new finally pushed me over the edge. So I set out searching for custom ROMs and I looked at CyanogenMod first, a long-time favorite. But it was either a choice between a stable ICS — isn’t that what I was running away from? — with CM9, or a nightly Jelly Bean with CM10 and many bugs still plaguing it.

Then I widened my horizons, downloaded about 10 different ROMs and ended up on FoxHound, a surprisingly awesome custom ROM that ticked so many boxes for me. Here are the reasons I fell in love with it and decided to use it as a daily driver.

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It’s been three months now since Google and ASUS teamed up to produce the Nexus 7, a brilliant device for its surprisingly low price tag. I’ve had mine since release day and I haven’t put the tablet down. Taking it to work, school and constantly using it around the house, the Nexus 7 is a firm companion of mine.

However, with any new device the first wave of orders isn’t going to be perfect. We’ve had problems with the screen creaking, problems with dead pixels and a variety of other things. Unfortunately, this can’t be fixed in an update, but a few other glitches and annoyances could. Android 4.1.2 was recently released for the Nexus 7, and this being the first system update since release, everyone was a bit excited.

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I like to think that one of our big responsibilities here at AppStorm is to try out new methods of customizing and improving our phone experience, then translating the technical jargon of developers, and delivering to our readers a clear and concise method for that customization.

So, when I had been reading on the forums that a way had been worked out to add Google Now to a lot of ICS phones, I jumped right on it.

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The CyanogenMod team have begun rolling out their Alpha-rated CM10 series of custom ROMs. These ROMs use Google’s latest ‘Jelly Bean’ build of Android, otherwise known as 4.1.

I’ve been running it on my Transformer TF101 this past week, and thoroughly enjoying it. Now I would like to highlight some features of the ROM, both from the Jelly Bean updates and CyanogenMod’s own additions.

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