Currently Browsing

General

Since the timid beginnings of the Android platform, we have seen several Twitter clients rise and soar, some falling quickly, others garnering a loyal fanbase and developing further. From the good ol’ Tweetdeck and Seesmic to the shiny new Falcon Pro and Tweetings, passing by the ever-present and ever-loved Plume, there’s no shortage of Twitter client choice and you’d be hard-pressed to find a topic that ignites passionate debates as much as the “best Twitter client” conversation. Mention that once, and you’ll have a slew of replies from people naming one of dozens of different apps and discussing how excellent their choice is.

On Android.Appstorm, we’ve long ago recognized that there’s really no definite answer to the question. As long as there are developers out there coding new clients, we will try them and we will review them for you. We also reckon that every client is flawed and perfect at the same time. Because there are as many different Twitter usages as there are Twitter users, any app can be excellent for a particular person but simply dreadful for another. That’s why, over the past couple of months, we have shared with you our favorite clients in our “My Twitter Client” series.

Below, you will find quick links to some of our writer’s picks, where they explain what they need in a Twitter app, the reasons for their choice and what they love about it. I’ve also added links to some of our most recent reviews, for a more complete overview of the Twitter options landscape. Check them out, and let us know in the comments which app you use and why.

Team’s Favorite Twitter Clients

Other Twitter Client Reviews

I still remember having a few heated debates back in 2008 with social media advocates about the future of Twitter. At the time, although I had an account on the service, I had never used it. Instead, I was a firm believer that Jaiku — which Google later bought and used as a stepping stone for Buzz and Google+ — would prevail because of its native support for conversations. Twitter was a chaotic mess, with no way to follow a conversation back. But oh how things change!

In 2009, I had abandoned Jaiku and moved to Twitter. But when I switched to Android 2 years ago, the sheer amount of Twitter clients had me befuddled for months until I settled on the official app. Then I got bored, tried several alternatives again, used some for a while, dismissed others quickly… And up to this day, I don’t think there is one Twitter Android client to rule them all, so I use the official Twitter app on my phone, Falcon Pro on my tablet, and Plume on my Android TV stick. Read on to find out why.

(more…)

Earlier this week, Amazon announced that they were expanding the availability of their Appstore to 200 more countries, which brings them to an almost worldwide audience. Earlier, if you lived in an unsupported country, you had to resort to a few tricks to install the Appstore on your device, so thankfully, this will no longer be the case.

However, having used the Appstore for a while when it was first launched — especially because of the daily free app offer — I admit that it has lost its appeal and it’s been ages since I’ve even bothered to install it on any of my devices. The main reason is that any app purchased through it requires the Appstore to be installed on your device to even work. That verification process annoyed me enough that I simply let go of Amazon’s Appstore, purchased the free apps that I had gotten through it and that I needed from Google’s Play Store, and never looked back.

Apart from owning a Kindle device, I see very few reasons one would use the Appstore, but I might be wrong. What about you? Do you use the Appstore on your non-Kindle devices?

Historians may remember April 21st as the modern date of the founding of Rome but the 2013 iteration of the day will forever be associated in the Android community as the conclusion of a week which included the international expansion of Amazon’s Appstore and the final release of Google’s Glass Explorer Edition models of Google Glass alongside the details of the device’s specifications.

(more…)

When it comes to Twitter clients I bounce around a lot — on all platforms. Heck on the desktop I use TweetDeck even though I’m not a huge fan of it. I haven’t really found a free app that I really like and I really don’t want to pay a ton of money for a client when the service itself is free. On Android, I’ve run the gamut: Twitter’s official app, Twicca, Carbon, Tweetlanes, Falcon, Tweetdeck, and more. Each, while good, left me wanting something more. Then I found out about Robird.

(more…)

Over the past couple of weeks, there has been a lot of chatter about Google taking a step to unify their different messaging platforms into one. The rumors started solidifying last week, with screenshots and what seems to be a codename / final name: Babel. At the same time, we’ve also heard news that Google might be lining up to buy the popular messaging client Whatsapp, which was later denied by a spokesperson for the company. Then of course we saw the launch of Facebook Home along with its Messenger Chat Heads.

This whole “rush” towards messaging has us wondering about the platforms that you use to communicate with your friends and family. Are you still reliant on SMS? Have you moved towards traditional IM solutions like Google Talk or Facebook Messenger, or are you using the new solutions like Whatsapp, LiveProfile, and others? Or do you rely on a mix of services to connect with different people?

April 14th. The middle of the month and a date remembered by some as the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 or perhaps the unprecedented tie result for the Academy Award for Best Actress in the ’60s. Here in 2013, we use this date to mark the culmination of another week of Android news.

(more…)

Earlier today, Connor shared with you the Facebook Home launch news in This Week in Android’s recap. The new launcher should be available to some Android devices on April 12th, and its still unclear whether it will include all functionality — like chat heads and the notification tweaks — or just the launcher and app drawer.

This leaves me rather perplex. On the one hand, it’s interesting to see someone taking a different approach to the Android home beyond widgets and launching apps. On the other, you might not benefit from the full experience unless you have dedicated hardware like on the HTC First.

Besides, it’s still Facebook, which means that the experience will be reliant on your friends. If you have awesome friends who travel, throw parties and are always doing something interesting, then you’ll probably love Facebook Home. But if your “friends” are just high-school acquaintances who post duckfaces, flood you with not-so-adorable kid photos, and chronicle every meal they eat, then you probably won’t enjoy Facebook Home as much as Zuckerberg wants you to.

Will you give this new launcher a try? Or are you not the least bit interested in having Facebook as your home?

It’s been an interesting week. Today we celebrate World Health Day and the culmination of a week that began with April Fools –and, oh boy did Google bring it this year! From Google Nose to Facebook Home, let’s take a look at what’s been going on this week in the big wide world of Android. (more…)

Before I entered the social part of the Internet, I was reluctant to share any kind of information. I can’t really remember how it all changed, it’s funny, because it wasn’t even that long ago — four or five years. Now I’ve got an account basically on every website I visit on a daily basis, including social sites. This means Facebook, Google+ and let’s not forget about twitter. At first, I was attracted to the idea of micro-blogging: sharing things you do as they happen, without the need of logging them or remembering them at the end of the day was different, and quite intriguing. Even though news sites and blogs use Twitter to spread the word about their published articles, it is still that micro-blogging service that we all know and love.

As with all services out there, Twitter has an API (Application Programming Interface) that enables application developers to create countless applications for viewing feeds and analyzing data. Devs have done just that and there are numerous clients on the Play Store that cater to different types of users. The one that caught my attention was Twitter’s own application and today I’ll try and share with you why I use it and not any other third party application.

(more…)

Page 1 of 45