We’ve all been awaiting Key Lime Pie with baited breath, but Google’s once again surprised us with an incremental update to Android. 4.3, which is still called Jelly Bean and largely keeps the same interface we’ve all grown to know and love.

That being said, while 4.3 is an incremental update, it’s also an important one. Google’s bringing some much-needed features to Android that will make life easier for both OEMs like Samsung and HTC as well as average users. Read on to find out about some of the features that most excite us about Android 4.3.

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By now, the Glass Explorers Program is in full swing; websites are producing more and more articles on Google’s latest ‘experiment’ and the product is generating a lot of buzz. I was lucky enough to get into the Explorers Program (thanks to this tweet) and have been using Google Glass for a few weeks now. I’ve been formulating a lot of thoughts about it: how it is to wear, what I can use it for now, what it will be useful for with the right apps, etc. I’m going to talk about all of that and more in this article.

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I remember when I first started using IM applications, a long decade ago, how excited I was by the presence of emoticons. Instead of typing long sentences, you could convey a lot of feelings in one character, and given that I’m the kind of person who uses facial expressions extensively in real life, emoticons felt like the most authentic written-form translation of my speech.

Prior to Jelly Bean, Android users were left in the cold when it came to emojis. Only a few third-party applications like Whatsapp or Google Talk supported them within their own confines. But if you received emojis from a friend’s iPhone through SMS or on Twitter for example, you were faced with a square placeholder. Thankfully, the situation has changed with Jelly Bean, and now Android can not only read emojis, but it can also write them. Here’s the complete guide.

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The idea of learning a new language may bring back horrible memories of chanting aloud amo, amas, amat, amamus, amatis, amant, and discussing whether the vocative form is indeed a case — but there is a better way to learn. If you’ve always loved the idea of picking up a second — or third, or fourth — language, your phone and tablet could help you out.

Having an Italian girlfriend spurred me into attempting to learn the lingo. I am essentially monolingual — I know enough French to get by, a smattering of German, and sufficient Latin to satisfy my love of etymology. I needed something to help me become fluent in Italian. Duolingo seemed to fit the bill.

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We’re continuing with our tradition of showcasing crowd-funded projects that could be interesting to your as an Android enthusiast. Featuring new and exciting ideas at the beginning of each month, we help you sift through the hundreds of projects filling Kickstarter and Indiegogo to find the rare gems that are worth contributing to.

This month, however, is quite special since there are so many already funded and quite original projects. That’s why I will pick 5 projects to discuss, then link to several others that are worth considering as well. Read on to discover them all.

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Last week we had Nexus 7s and Chromecasts. This week, the fun rolls on with Kindle Fire rumours and Google Glass expansion. Let’s take a look at what’s been going on! (more…)

When the Chromecast was announced last week, I got very excited about it and received many questions on Twitter from people who knew I already owned an Android TV Stick — an iMito MX1 to be precise. They were either wondering about the difference between the devices, either questioning my enthusiasm towards it given that I already have something similar.

After all, it’s easy to be confused. Both serve as an HDMI extension to your TV that makes it a lot smarter than it is, and both seem to play well with Android devices. So what exactly is the difference, and which one should you buy? Read on for the explanation.

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We inhabit a digital world that is instant, on-demand, and unlimited. It seems strange, then, that a broadcaster-controlled form of media, once the only form of broadcasting available, should still be popular. I’m talking about radio, a method of transmission no longer restricted to airwaves, thanks to broadband and the ease of streaming it provides.

Whatever the reasoning, a large number of us still listen to radio, and we have a massive selection of stations to choose from, including many from across the globe. This is great, but there is one respect in which traditional radio still trumps its modern-day counterpart — convenience. The reality is that it’s easier to switch on a radio and flick through the auto-tuned channels than it is to navigate many internet radio apps.

Maybe RadiON can provide an exception to this rule. Though it packs just as many stations as other apps in this genre — “over 50,000” is the claim — RadiON has a vintage-inspired style, as well as various alarm clocks and music collection features, all delivered for the modest price of $0.99. Is this enough to provide internet radio with analogue radio’s advantages, though?

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Strategy games, particularly when set in space, tend to be complicated, stressful, and packed with huge learning curves. Not so with Rymdkapsel. It’s a beautiful minimalistic game of base building mixed with Tetris, skipping all that intimidating micro-management in favor of something more pure. It’s both brilliantly straightforward and just plain brilliant.
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I’m a huge fan of TED Talks. I don’t know too many people who aren’t fans of the service, and I’m jealous of my friends who managed to find time to make it out when there was a TEDx event at my alma mater.

That being said, there might be some of you who don’t watch TED videos or listen to TED podcasts. Heaven forbid, but maybe you’ve never actually heard of it. The TED app on Android might be the perfect way to get into it. Read on for our full review.

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